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A pre-school with a difference incorporating the best of international principles and practices.

A gentle environment that provides warmth & harmony, helping the gentle transition from the security of home to the approaching school years.

  • Fun and exciting programmes planned each day for your child.
  • Weekly lesson plans Which shows you what we plan each day so that you can monitor our performance.
  • A treat for your child with our Baby Magical Maths, Advanced Reading Programme, Painting, Music, and lot more fun  activities.
  • Individual learning plan designed especially for your child, to target areas which need developing so that they are ready for school.
  • Qualified nursery personnel offering a low child to staff ratio closely supervised.
  • Learning and Play equipment conforming to international standards.
  • Lunch and Snacks provided- cooked at the Centre.
  • Flexible timings

The activities planned could be grouped into –

  • Toddler programmes( for children from 18 months to 24 months)
  • Junior nursery school programme(age group 2 to 3)
  • Pre kindergarten programme( age group 3 to 4)

The most significant and distinctive feature of the IB Primary Years Programme are the six transdisciplinary themes.

Six transdisciplinary themes

These themes provide IB World Schools with the opportunity to incorporate local and global issues into the curriculum and effectively allow students to “step up” beyond the confines of learning within subject areas.

  • Who we are

Inquiry into the nature of the self; beliefs and values; person, physical, mental, social and spiritual health; human relationships including families, friends, communities, and cultures; rights and responsibilities; what it means to be human.

  • Where we are in place and time

Inquiry into orientation in place and time; personal histories; homes and journeys; the discoveries, explorations and migrations of humankind; the relationship between and the interconnectedness of individuals and civilizations, from local and global perspectives.

  • How we express ourselves

Inquiry into the ways in which we discover and express ideas, feelings, nature, culture, beliefs and values; the ways in which we reflect on, extend and enjoy our creativity; our appreciation of the aesthetic.

  • How the world works

Inquiry into the natural world and its laws, the interaction between the natural world (physical and biological) and human societies; how humans use their understanding of scientific principles; the impact of scientific and technological advances on society and on the environment

  • How we organize ourselves

Inquiry into the interconnectedness of human-made systems and communities; the structure and function of organizations; societal decision-making; economic activities and their impact on humankind and the environment.

  • Sharing the planet

Inquiry into rights and responsibilities in the struggle to share finite resources with other people and other living things; communities and the relationship within and between them; access to equal opportunities; peace and conflict resolution.

Each theme is addressed each year by all students. (Students aged 3 to 5 engage with four of the themes each year).

These transdisciplinary themes help teachers to develop a programme of inquiries–investigations into important ideas, identified by the schools, and requiring a high level of involvement on the part of the students. These inquiries are substantial, in-depth and usually last for several weeks.

Since these ideas relate to the world beyond the school, students see their relevance and connect with it in an engaging and challenging way. Students who learn in this way begin to reflect on their roles and responsibilities as learners and become actively involved with their education. All students will come to realise that that a unit of inquiry involves them in in-depth exploration of an important idea, and that the teacher will collect evidence of how well they understand that idea. They will expect to be able to work in a variety of ways, on their own and in groups, to allow them to learn to their best advantage.

1. Learner profile

The learner profile describes a list of attributes that promote academic excellence and the establishing of a personal value system leading to international-mindedness. It is expected that PYP teachers will address individual student development regarding each of these attributes.

The programme encourages students to become:

  • Inquirers—They develop their natural curiosity. They acquire the skills necessary to conduct inquiry and research and show independence in learning. They actively enjoy learning and this love of learning will be sustained throughout their lives.
  • Knowledgeable—They explore concepts, ideas and issues that have local and global significance.In so doing, they acquire in-depth knowledge and develop understanding across a broad and balanced range of disciplines.
  • Thinkers—They exercise initiative in applying thinking skills critically and creatively to recognize and approach complex problems, and make reasoned, ethical decisions.
  • Communicators—They understand and express ideas and information confidently and creatively in more than one language and in a variety of modes of communication. They work effectively and willingly in collaboration with others.
  • Principled—They act with integrity and honesty, with a strong sense of fairness, justice and respect for the dignity of the individual, groups and communities. They take responsibility for their own actions and the consequences that accompany them.
  • Open-minded—They understand and appreciate their own cultures and personal histories, and are open to the perspectives, values and traditions of other individuals and communities. They are accustomed to seeking and evaluating a range of points of view, and are willing to grow from the experience.
  • Caring—They show empathy, compassion and respect towards the needs and feelings of others. They have a personal commitment to service, and act to make a positive difference to the lives of others and to the environment.
  • Risk-takers—They approach unfamiliar situations and uncertainty with courage and forethought, and have the independence of spirit to explore new roles, ideas and strategies. They are brave and articulate in defending their beliefs.
  • Balanced—They understand the importance of intellectual, physical and emotional balance to achieve personal well-being for themselves and others.
  • Reflective—They give thoughtful consideration to their own learning and experience. They are able to assess and understand their strengths and limitations in order to support their learning and personal development.

MIDDLE SCHOOL (Grades 6-8)

From the Middle School, the curriculum takes on a broader facet. It focuses on a subject-based curriculum besides meaningful and rich assignments for accentuating learning experience. The curriculum for this segment has the following features:

  • Prepares the students to commence exam courses in class 9 and beyond.
  • Comprises a wider range of subjects reflecting those required for the Class 10 Board Examinations.
  • Students are encouraged to take on greater responsibility that goes with more independent work.
  • Choice of Second and Third Languages.
  • All science lessons take place in laboratories.
  • The curriculum is a fusion of international educational practices including interesting Indian situations.
  • The required individual attention and significant pastoral support are ensured because of the small size of the class.
  • The timetable accommodates whole range of co-curricular activities in both athletics and arts.

 

SECONDARY SCHOOL (Grades 9-10)

At the end of Class 8, students make the choice whether to follow the :

  • ICSE or
  • Cambridge International Examinations IGCSE curriculum

         for the next two years.

Both empower the students to progress to either the ISC +2 or CIA A-levels  or the IBDP.

The faculty helps the students and their parents make an informed choice taking into account the interests of the students and their plans for University education.

Both offer a balanced range of subjects Mathematics and the Sciences are taught alongside History, Geography, Art, IT/Computer Applications and the Second Language as well as English.

Although these are two distinct curricula, there is a common focus of attention to individual needs. Meaningful and rich assignments for accentuating learning experience are an integral part of the curriculum.
 
The school day will, of course, offer the full range of extra-mural activities covering both Athletics and Arts.

SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOL (Grades 11-12)

Subject options in Class 11

ISC Plus 2

All students must follow courses in English and 4 other subjects. The following are the possible options

Maths/Computer Science/PE/EVS

Computer Science/PE/EVS

Maths/Computer Science/PE/EVS

Physics

Physics

Economics

Chemistry

Chemistry

Accountancy

Biology

Maths

Commerce

English

English

English

A

B

C

To enter professional courses in India, students need to take:

1. Medicine - Chemistry, Biology, Physics, English
2.Engineering - Maths, Physics, Chemistry, English

A - Level

The A Level programme consists of AS qualification (studied in Class 11) and A2 qualification (studied in class 12).A student may choose to study four subjects in Class 11, but this will often be reduced to 3 subjects in Class 12 (students obtaining three A-Levels and one AS Level)

1

2

3

4

Business Studies

Physics

Chemistry

Mathematics

Economics

Chemistry

IT

Physics

Accounting

Biology

Physics

Chemistry

Choose a Subject (optional)

Choose a Subject (optional)

Choose a Subject (optional)

Choose a Subject (optional)

Mathematics

Mathematics

Mathematics

Biology

English Literature/

English Language

English Literature/

English Language

English Literature/

English Language

English Literature/

English Language

IT

IT

Biology

Business Studies

Psychology

Psychology

Psychology

Psychology

Art & Design

Art & Design

Art & Design

Art & Design

We would take into consideration demand for other subjects, but cannot guarantee to offer additional subjects unless there is adequate demand and available resources.

To enter professional courses in India, students would need to take AS-Level English language.

The IB Diploma Programme

The IB DP curriculum contains six subject groups and a core of three parts. Students study concurrently:

Three subjects at higher level (240 hours each).

Three subjects at standard level (150 hours each).

All three parts of the core of the programme - Theory of Knowledge, Extended Essay & CAS[Creativity, Action & Service].

The subjects offered within the 6 groups are:

Group 1

Group 2

Group 3

Group 4

Group 5

Group 6

English
(Language A : Literature)

French

(Language B/ab Initio)
 

Hindi
(Language B)

Business & Management
Economics
History
ITGS

Psychology

Physics
Chemistry
Biology

Mathematics HL/SL

Mathematical Studies

Visual Arts

The student can choose one subject from each group. If required, he can choose one more subject from any group from 1 to 5 instead of a group 6 subject.

The core components are:

The extended essay is a requirement for students to engage in independent research through an in-depth study of a question relating to one of the subjects they are studying.

Theory of knowledge is a course designed to encourage each student to reflect on the nature of knowledge by critically examining different ways of knowing (perception, emotion, language and reason) and different kinds of knowledge (scientific, artistic, mathematical and historical).

Creativity, Action & Service [CAS] requires that students actively learn from the experience of doing real tasks beyond the classroom. Students can combine all three components or do activities related to each one of them separately.

Download Course Outline here